Responsive customer service…

October 6, 2004

Cory Doctorow, author and frequent poster (um, that doesn’t work… posting person?  augh.) at BoingBoing.net pointed out a dreadful part of the policy put forth by Snap.com, a new search engine.

Search engines demand our trust and our goodwill, and they cry out to be an authorative namespace for locations relevant to query terms. For Snap to assert that it can own how you can link to them — despite the fact that this is nonsensical in both law and practice — displays such an imponderable depth of contempt and ignorance for the Web’s norms that it is truly unforgivable.

Update: Snap founder Bill Gross sez, “Cory, thanks for catching that and posting. We’re changing the policy, so thanks!”

What Cory didn’t point out is that they responded.  Let me repeat that:  THEY RESPONDED.

Cory didn’t file suit against the company, organize an active protest, go on the evening news.  Just a single post on a popular web log.

This points to two different trends I’ve noticed a few times with increasing frequency: first, savvy companies are monitoring the internet conversations about them and their industry and, second, those companies are responding to intelligent conversation and adjusting their products, services or agreements to match standards, de facto or otherwise.

The more this happens, the more I think it will become common practice – which is good.  However, the internet community (myself included) needs to be willing to stand up and vote for the good as well as expose the bad.  Cheers to Snap.com for listening…

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